Illegal Search Warrants

A lot of people know that in many criminal matters, law enforcement officers must obtain a search warrant before searching a residence, a vehicle or an individual's personal effects. In truth, not all law enforcement officers follow the law in this important area.

Protecting Our Clients' Legal Rights

If you believe you or a loved one is being charged with a crime as a result of an illegal search, talk to a lawyer before you talk to the police about your case. Weisberg & Weisberg, PLLC in Newport News and Norfolk, Virginia is highly familiar with the law regarding search warrants. We are assertive about protecting our clients' legal rights. We can help you answer questions like:

  • What is the definition of an unlawful search?
  • Should the police have obtained a warrant?
  • Was there probable cause?
  • Was there bad faith on behalf of the officer?
  • Was their informant reliable?
  • Was it served in proper time frame?
  • Were people hurt?
  • Did they file affidavit with the court?
  • How do we post bond?

What Does The Constitution Say About Warrants?

The Bill of Rights of the U.S. Constitution (Article IV) states:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

You should be aware that, in general, your phone calls are being recorded from jail. To protect confidentiality, our attorneys always provide in-person visits to clients, not phone consultations with a person in custody. We take the time to do in-person visits to make sure your rights and privacy are protected as much as possible.

Contact Us | We Offer A Free Consultation

Questions about illegal search warrants or other criminal law issues? Contact our offices in Norfolk or Newport News today.